CAR-T cell therapies and Breakthrough Male Contraception Gel
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January 27, 2021
 RECENT Talks

ASH 2020 Updates: CAR T Cell Therapies in Multiple Myeloma  

with Dr. Shaji Kumar
January 27, 2021, 10 AM EST
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We kickstart the new year with a discussion on CAR T cells in myeloma treatment with a focus on the CT053, a CAR T-cell therapy targeting the BCMA protein and granted orphan drug status by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of multiple myeloma. CAR T- cell therapy harnesses a patient’s own immune cells to fight cancer. These therapies consist of collecting a patient’s T-cells — a type of immune cell with the ability to fight cancers — and genetically modifying them in the lab to produce a chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, that targets a specific cancer protein. American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2020 meeting saw CAR T cell therapies for myeloma presented and discussed at length. The Myeloma panel of Gary Petersen, Jack Aiello, and Cynthia Chmielewski is talking to Dr. Shaji Kumar of Mayo Clinic about CT053 and other CART therapies in the pipeline for myeloma treatment.

Panelists
Dr Shaji Kumar 
Gary Petersen
Jack Aiello 
Cynthia Chmielewski 
Priya Menon
February 18, 2020, 11 AM EST
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The FDA recently granted priority review to a new drug application for melflufen (INN melphalan flufenamide), in combination with dexamethasone. Melflufen is intended for use as a first choice for patients with multiple myeloma whose disease is refractory to at least one proteasome inhibitor, one immunomodulatory agent, and one anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody (triple-class refractory). Melflufen is a peptide-drug conjugate (PDC) that targets aminopeptidases and rapidly releases alkylating agents into tumor cells. The combination treatment demonstrated encouraging efficacy and a manageable safety profile in heavily pretreated patients. The myeloma panel is taking a deep dive on melflufen with Dr. Paul G. Richardson from Dana Farber Cancer Institute and will touch upon the details of the trials, side effects and treatment regimen.






Panelists
Dr Paul G. Richardson
Gary Petersen
Jack Aiello
Yelak Beru
Priya Menon
Jan 15, 2021, 10 AM EST
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Men who wish to control their fertility currently have limited options. They have to rely on their female partner using contraceptives, use condoms, undergo vasectomy, or abstain. The male contraceptive study being discussed is testing a gel as a possible new method for male family planning. It is a transparent gel applied daily to the skin of the shoulders. It aims to decrease a man’s sperm production in a reversible way without reducing sexual drive. The study also looks at the men’s compliance and couple’s acceptance of this contraceptive method. Expanding male contraceptive options could help make family planning more of a shared responsibility between women and men. We are taking a deep dive into the study and recruitment requirements with the Director, Women’s Health Clinical Research Center at University of Pennsylvania and Principal Investigator of the study at Penn Fertility Care Dr. Kurt T. Barnhart and Director of Operations, Elizabeth Steider. Joining us on the advocate panel is Dr. Logan Nickels, Research Director at Male Contraceptive Initiative and fertility coach and author Kristen Darcy.
Panelists
Dr. Kurt T Barnhart
Elizabeth Steider
Dr. Logan Nickels
Kristen Darcy
Priya Menon
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