Connecting Patients to Clinical Trials

Developing innovative technologies and media for facilitating patient recruitment

TrialX enables...

Patients

such as Cinda to find trials for herself and her loved ones

Search Trials

Investigators

such as Jennifer to complete her clinical trial recruitment on time

Upload Your Trial

Hospitals

such as the Cleveland Clinic to create a centralized trial listing and recruitment tool

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Non-profits

such as the MMRF to create awareness for research and trials

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Why customers love TrialX.

Innovative Technology

Developed using an award winning semantic technology that matches patients to trials using their full-clinical record and clinical trial inclusion/exclusion criteria. Recently, we developed another novel interactive question/answering technology (winner of the 2011 NCI/Health 2.0 Developer Challenge) that guides and connects patients to research site using live calls

Great User Experience

At TrialX, we develop tools that we'd like to use. We continually refine the user interface and the flow to make it even easier for our customers to do their tasks effectively.

Customer Service

We Listen. We listen to what our customers say and often we fix/add features even before they tell us. The secret sauce of our awesome customer service is that we also "listen" to DATA. We mine access logs, error logs to solve problems before they arise (sort of like the Minory Report!)

I have been very pleased with the recruitment effort of TrialX for my research studies. They have been very diligent in finding qualified subjects in a reasonable time frame. I would definitely recommend their services to clinical research sites.

Dr. Arthur Waldbaum MD
  • It never ceases to amaze me how far afield some of our readers are here at MMB.  New Zealand, Australia, Europe–even Africa. None of that makes Alaska any less exotic.  A myeloma patient there can’t just drive a few hours to visit Dana-Farber or Mayo Clinic, making things even more difficult than they already are. […]
  • Sometimes I suffer from techno paralysis. I want to apologize to anyone that has tried to reach me via email the last two days. When using an email that’s attached to a registered domain name, an organization or business needs to pay a company to host the email. I had planned to switch companies and […]
  • Reflecting back on my autologous stem cell transplant in the summer of 2011, the experience wasn’t all that bad–except for one glaring issue: nausea.  I understand some patients experience very little nausea during the recovery process.  But for the rest of us, it’s a truly miserable experience. But there may be hope on the horizon.  […]
  • This became up close and personal when this myeloma patient became a caregiver to his wife who was diagnosed with breast cancer.  My wife Anita had always thought I was so strong as I went through 2 stem cell transplants and 8 bouts of high dose chemo (the hair loss kind), and 3 cases of pneumonia, and one case of sepsis.  However, I found I melted into uncontrollable tears when I felt helpless with lit [...]
  • From time to time I like to do follow-ups about former Patient Snapshot subjects–especially when the news is good.   In February, 2013, I wrote about Mark, a newly diagnosed patient that was having a hard time.  Mark’s daughter, Stephanie, had emailed me for help; she was very concerned about her dad.  I was more […]
  • Thanks for the encouraging emails and comments!  I’m stoked (OK, dexed up!) to keep on working.  I did see that some of you are having trouble downloading the extra large pictures I posted yesterday–and I have a lot more to put up today–so I’ll cut the size down on this next batch. We were told […]
  • Last year I surprised Pattie when I asked her where she wanted to live when I was gone.  It was a difficult topic, but she didn’t hesitate.  “Not here.” she said.  “Then let’s move now, when I can still help out.”  I responded, kick-starting an exhausting, eight month long odyssey. We had decided to make […]
  • Lots to share today.  I’ll start with how I’m feeling and what comes next. After returning from Boston feeling a bit better, I unexpectedly relapsed.  Back on the toilet every 2 or 3 hours for a couple more days.  No fever; that apparently had been a neutropenic spike up to 102.5.  Have you ever had […]
  • The American Society of Hematology (ASH) meetings are just around the corner, so there should be a lot of myeloma related news soon.  In the meantime, here’s an update. In August I wrote about a new clinical trial for smoldering myeloma patients.  Initiated by OncoPep, it featured an experimental cancer vaccine, PVX-410: Immunotherapy clinical trial […]
  • A week ago, good friend and fellow patient blogger, Gary Petersen, wrote a post about an important topic: Why do people die from Multiple Myeloma?  Lack Of Awareness??  It Is Complicated!! Gary is very passionate about his view that heightened myeloma awareness–combined with treatment by experienced myeloma experts–can save lives.  If that means extend a […]
  • Looks like I called it!  A few weeks ago I inferred that panobinostat could well be the next myeloma drug to garner FDA approval: Which new myeloma drug will the FDA approve next?   Check out this article I found on OncLive late last week: FDA Schedules ODAC Hearing for Panobinostat in Multiple Myeloma Silas […]
  • Are you like me?  Are your bones negatively affected by multiple myeloma?  If so, Wednesday’s Myeloma Cure Panel discussion could be important. I will be joining Gary Petersen, Jack Aiello and Cynthia Chmielewski to interview specialist, Dr. Amrita Krishnan about it. Here’s the link: http://us8.campaign-archive1.com/?u=f6b39f08e8d84806e92f11204&id=e4ab659159&e=2c9ca24fe3 If you have questions you can leave them here in […]
  • Still don’t feel well, but I don’t care.  Our walk on the beach this morning was spectacular! An osprey dove from 200 ft above straight down, snatching a glistening silver fish in his talons six paces in front of us.  Later a pelican swooped 10 feet above us, cutting suddenly out to sea and skimming […]
  • It’s good to be home!  My flight from Boston was a bit bumpy but on time. Here’s a picture of me and fellow myeloma survivor, Cindy, before last night’s Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) Light the Night event.  A bit grainy, but her smile shines through.  If you ask me, I’m looking a little green […]
  • Every October a group of myeloma survivors and caregivers get together in Boston to help celebrate our lives–and the lives of those we lost this year.  Our reunion centers on the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) Light the Night fundraiser.  The even was tonight. We’ve been lucky; good weather each of the past four years.  […]
  • I heard that Dr. Bart Barlogie was retiring.  Is it true? No.  But according to the Associated Press, Dr. Barlogie is resigning as head of Little Rock’s Myeloma Institute for Research and Therapy (MIRT): London Doctor to lead UAMS cancer Center LITTLE ROCK — A London doctor has been tapped to serve as the new […]
  • I’ve “known” Matt for what seems to be a long time.  We have spoken by phone and exchanged emails for almost two years.  I find his story exceptionally hopeful.  Matt’s unusual type of multiple myeloma was unresponsive to therapy combinations that work for most everyone else.  Then a breakthrough! I’ve been trying to get Matt […]
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  • I have expressed concern about the high cost of chemotherapy meds for me and my fellow multiple myeloma patients a number of times.  So last night’s 60 Minutes report about it really hit home. Here is an excerpt of the transcript that hits closest to home, featuring M.D. Anderson oncologist, Dr. Hagop Kantarjian discussing Gleevec, […]
  • My good friend, myeloma survivor, serial marathoner and folk hero, Don Wright, just keeps on truckin’.  Despite being hospitalized with pneumonia two weeks ago, Don was at it again this weekend in Portland. Here’s an excerpt from an article I found about it on OregonLive.com: Portland Marathon another race on the way to 100 for […]