Thousands Of Women Are Tracking Their PCOS Symptoms Using Free PCOS Tracker on iOS & Android Smartphones

01 Oct

Thousands Of Women Are Tracking Their PCOS Symptoms Using Free PCOS Tracker on iOS & Android Smartphones

by Shweta Mishra

Hello everyone! Excited to share that the PCOS Tacker is yet to be four months old and helping more than 5K women track their daily and monthly symptoms related to PCOS. They are also tracking their mood, exercise and diet including daily protein portions and its sources. The active tasks integrated in the tracker is allowing them to monitor their neuromotor skills. Check out the insight from this week below.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 17, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
5054670

What did women diagnosed with PCOS say about the length of their menstrual cycles?

What did we ask?

We asked the PCOS Tracker participants about what the length of their menstrual cycles have been in the last six months, with response options ranging from number of days to ‘highly irregular’.

What did we find? 

Eighty seven percent of the folks tracking their PCOS symptoms using PCOS Tracker said that they were diagnosed with PCOS. Of these 87% of women diagnosed with PCOS, almost 60% of the women said they had “highly irregular” menstrual cycles. Moreover, about 10% of women had their cycles longer than 35 days. “Irregular menstrual cycles” was also the most prominent reason that made women who were NOT diagnosed with PCOS, THINK they may have PCOS.


PCOS Diagnosis and Length of Menstrual Cycle 

Long and irregular menstrual cycles have been have been the hallmark of PCOS and associated with increased risk of specific subtypes of ovarian cancer.

Irregular periods have been defined as less than eight periods in a year or menstrual cycles longer than 35 days. According to CDC, irregular periods maybe caused by lack of ovulation. But researchers are still trying to understand that if women with PCOS have multiple follicles in their ovaries, why can’t they ovulate? Interestingly enough, studies have shown that women with PCOS gain regular menstrual cycles with aging, “solely caused by follicle loss through the process of ovarian ageing.” 


Are women with PCOS who have “highly irregular periods” more prone to having infertility issues compared to women with PCOS who have regular periods but show other PCOS symptoms as predominant ones? We are going to learn about this and other developments in PCOS management while talking to PCOS expert Dr Carolyn Alexander of Southern California Reproductive Center on November 7, 2019 at 3pm PST (6pm EST) on curetalks.com. If you would like to ask a question to Dr Alexander, please send them to me at shweta@trialx.com OR just post it in comments section on the talk page.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

To download on iOS click here.

To download on Google Play click here.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 10, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two Weeks
4676669

How did women diagnosed with PCOS perceive their body weight for their height?

What did we ask?

Of the folks tracking their PCOS symptoms using PCOS Tracker, 87% said that they were diagnosed with PCOS. We asked the participants about how their body weight for their height looked like to them?

What did we find?

Of the 87.2% of women who said they were diagnosed with PCOS, 45% of women said they were Overweight, followed by 32% who said they were Obese. Only 2% of those women said they were underweight, the rest being normal in weight. 

PCOS Diagnosis & Body Weight

Does PCOS cause weight gain issues OR Does being overweight/obese lead to PCOS? Well, this seems to be a chicken and egg problem. The relationship of body weight and PCOS is complex and researchers are still looking for an answer. PCOS Tracker data shows that even though being overweight is associated with PCOS, women with normal body weight or underweight women can also have PCOS.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

To download on iOS click here.

To download on Google Play click here.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week

October 3, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two Weeks
4375736

What was the most common symptom that made women think they had PCOS?

What did we ask?

We asked the PCOS Tracker participants if they were diagnosed with PCOS or if they just thought that they may have PCOS. About 11% of the participants said they thought they may have PCOS. 

Further, we asked them what symptoms made them think they may have PCOS. 

What did we find?

Of the 11% participants who thought they may have PCOS, majority of them (nearly 40%) chose “very irregular periods” as the symptom that made them think so.” 

Next, nearly 30% of women said “extra hair problem” was one of the symptoms, that made them think they may have PCOS, followed by “severe acne problem” (20%) and “male pattern baldness” (7%).

According to the CDC, to determine if you have PCOS, irregular periods is one of the three main symptoms your doctor will look for. The other two symptoms of PCOS are: higher testosterone (male hormone) levels and multiple cysts on the ovaries.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

To download on iOS click here.

To download on Google Play click here.


When I was a teenager, I was not aware that having irregular periods may be a sign of something grave. I was never diagnosed with PCOS. But the more I read about it, the more my symptoms made me think I may have had PCOS. Many girls/women remain undiagnosed because they are confused about their symptoms, think it’s normal, and never see a specialist. So, we thought it is imperative that they be educated about their symptoms and equipped to keep track of their PCOS symptoms day by day and month by month. Moreover knowledge shared by these “citizen scientists” may lead the physicians and scientists to new insights into this disease. 

TrialX PCOS Tracker app made on DIY app making platform Appbakery is being used by thousands of women who have been diagnosed with PCOS or whose symptoms make them think they may have PCOS. More than 4K women are tracking their daily and monthly symptoms related to PCOS by means of surveys.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

To download on iOS click here.

To download on Google Play click here.

These women are also tracking their daily physical activity, sleep and diet patterns, so that they can understand how these parameters affect their PCOS symptoms and vice versa. In addition, the tracker also allows them to track their sleep duration and steps using their phone’s sensors and wearable (Fitbit).

Moreover, women using PCOS Tracker are also monitoring their neuropsychological functioning and motor fitness by performing ‘active tasks’ integrated into the app. For example, by performing the Finger Tapping Speed active task users are measuring their basic motor capabilities such as speed, accuracy, and rhythm.

Participants can gain access to their data by contacting us at shweta@trialx.com, in case they would like to discuss it with their physicians, so as to better inform their physician’s risk assessment and screening recommendations.

The app is HIPPA compliant and users remain anonymous while using the application. All data is handled with utmost security in compliance with data protection policies.

The analysis of data shared by participants using the PCOS Tracker shows several interesting insights. We will be sharing one new insight with you every week.


PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week

September 26, 2019

Number of Participants Tracking PCOS SymptomsParticipants Added in Last Two Weeks
4027722

Does having a family history of diabetes make women more prone to PCOS? 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a strong independent risk factor and a leading cause of diabetes in women. But does having a family history of diabetes make you more prone to developing PCOS? According to CDC, PCOS tends to run in families. Women whose mother or sister has PCOS or type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop PCOS.

What did we ask?

Analysing data shared on PCOS diagnosis and family history, we got an interesting insight. We asked the participants if they were diagnosed with PCOS or if they just thought that they may have PCOS. We also asked them if they had a family history of PCOS, Diabetes, CVD, Gestational diabetes, or None.

PCOS Tracker Data Analysis – Diagnosis of PCOS

What did we find?

Eighty seven percent of women using the app said they were diagnosed with PCOS and 10.9% said they thought they have PCOS.

PCOS Tracker Data Analysis – Family History

Of these 87% of women diagnosed with PCOS, maximum number of women said they had a family history of diabetes (40.8%), followed by women who did not have a family history of any of these conditions (29.5%), followed by 21.5% women who said they had a family history of PCOS. These observations from the PCOS tracker app corroborates the earlier findings, that having diabetes or metabolic disturbances similar to diabetes maybe a risk factor in the development of PCOS.

About few weeks back, The National Institutes of Health, Apple, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health announced their research partnership for a major long-term study of women’s health. Apple’s new Research App will be in App store later this year for iOS users to download. As Ars Technica cites, “researchers will leverage participants voluntary use of a smartphone research app” to collect data on menstrual cycles and gynaecological health.”

TrialX PCOS Tracker is equipping larger group of women to track their PCOS symptoms via both Apple and Android smartphones for free, so they can inform themselves and their physicians better.

What would you like to track via PCOS Tracker? What insight would you be interested in finding? Write to me at shweta@trialx.com!

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

To download PCOS Tracker on iOS click here.

To download PCOS Tracker on Google Play click here.

Any questions and queries regarding the PCOS Tracker app can be communicated to shweta@trialx.com.

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