Thousands Of Women Are Tracking Their PCOS Symptoms Using Free PCOS Tracker on iOS & Android Smartphones

01 Oct

Thousands Of Women Are Tracking Their PCOS Symptoms Using Free PCOS Tracker on iOS & Android Smartphones

by Shweta Mishra

Gearing up for the Holidays! Coming up new and improved PCOS tracker for easier tracking! Our PCOS Tracker is five months old and helping more than 7.7K women track their daily and monthly symptoms related to PCOS. They are also tracking their mood, exercise and diet including daily protein portions and its sources. The active tasks integrated in the tracker is allowing them to monitor their neuro-motor skills. Check out insights from this week below.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week Dec 5, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
7581660

Are you consuming enough fruits and vegetables? Why eating fruits and veggies is a big deal for many?

With several studies & organisations like the WHO backing it up, the concept of plant based diet has started to resonate with more and more people. An important part of plant based diet are fruits and vegetables. Reduced fruit and vegetable consumption is linked to poor health and increased risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, some cancers and obesity including difficult weight management – says the WHO. So I thought it’s important to keep track of our intake and bring in more variety in our diets if possible.

What are we asking?

We are asking the women using PCOS Tracker the number of servings of fruits and veggies they eat daily, describing what “one serving” means according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic.

One serving of fruits is equal to 1 cup of raw or cooked fruit, 1 cup of 100% fruit juice or ½ cup of dried fruit.

One serving of vegetables is ½ cup of cooked/dried/canned beans/peas/lentils OR 1 cup green leafy/raw salad.

What are we noticing?

Not to our surprise, fruits and vegetable based questions are amongst few of the common questions that are being skipped by the users of PCOS Tracker. Few big reasons I can imagine are, either they are:

  • skipping eating fruits and veggies on most days (many people don’t like the smell, texture, taste of vegetables & fruits) OR
  • eating so little that they can’t count OR 
  • they are having a hard time counting the servings because of the way fruits and veggies are incorporated in our meals.

I so wish it be the 3rd reason most people cite, if I do a poll. But unfortunately, studies say that, for many, affordability is an issue, and for others, medical conditions like IBS (which is also a comorbidity of PCOS) make it difficult to consume a lot of fruits and vegetables.

But most of the others, just don’t consume enough fruits and veggies just because it’s not in their habit or daily routine. So that is something we can work upon and change together!

What are the recommendations?

So there are different ways of putting it. The United States Department of Agriculture recommends that “fruits and vegetables should make up half of your plate at any given meal—about 30 percent vegetables and 20 percent fruit”. In yet more simpler terms

Adults should eat at least 1.5 to 2 cups per day of fruit and 2–3 cups per day of vegetables. 

The World Health Organisation and Food and Agriculture of the United Nation reports recommend

adults to consume at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day excluding starchy vegetables.

What’s the reality?

According to CDC’s recent reports, only 1 in 10 adults meet their recommended intake of fruits and vegetables. 1 in 10! Does it not sound familiar to us living at close quarters with PCOS?

What are some of the ways you use to meet your recommendations?

Clearly, eating required portions of fruits and veggies is hard to meet. So what can we do about it? Here are some ways, I think makes it easier to work them up into our routine at least 3-5 days a week:

  • Start by replacing one snack time with “fruit time”.
  • One good way is to churn it and drink it.
  • Chop veggies whenever you have time and keep in refrigerator for ease of use while cooking a quick meal.
  • Always add a good chunky salad in your meals.
  • Carry your fruits to your car if you are super-busy.
  • When grocery shopping try buying a new variety of fruit or veggie. You may get hooked to that one for life.

What are some ways you suggest to keep fruits and veggies consumption up to mark? Share it with us fellow PCOS buddies! We would love to hear from you in the comments section. Or email them to me at shweta@trialx.com and I will post them here. 

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.




PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week Nov 28, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
7274846

What did women tracking their PCOS symptoms with PCOS Tracker say about their diets?

Thanksgiving is here! “Celebrations” and “healthy food” almost never go hand in hand. But I say, let your hair down, put on your best dress and enjoy! We are human after all! Now coming to what we learnt from PCOS Tracker this week.

What we asked?

Talking about food, this week we analysed what PCOS trackers had to say about their diet habits. We asked the women tracking their PCOS symptoms about the kind of diet they followed and also what they thought of their body weight?

What we found?

Here is what we found. 

Not surprised to see that very few (only 8.4%) women followed a low carb high fat diet, also called the “Keto diet”. One big concern of many folks I interacted with regarding Keto diets is that the high fat content may lead to abnormal lipid profile and make their heart sick. But proponents of Keto diet deny this. 


Gary Taubes, a celebrated investigative journalist and Keto diet proponent believes its Sugar or Carbs that “make you fat and give you heart disease”. He says

“If you want to get fat out of your fat cells, as was pointed out by Nobel Prize winning scientist in the 1960s, the fundamental thing you have to do is lower your insulin levels.”

and that

“The most efficient way to do it is by removing the carbohydrates which are secreting insulin in response, to keeping protein relatively modest, and then replacing the carbohydrate calories with fat.”

What about heart health you ask? Here is what Gary has to say

“The question of long term health is a good question, but in the short term and in the existing trials, and for many of us in this world, we’ve been eating this way for 10-15 years in my case. And so far I have no obvious signs of  incipient heart disease, which is what people fear.”

Mindy stone a strong Keto follower who lost 40 lbs and many inches on Keto says to all who are worried about their heart health

“How could eating a keto diet be any more dangerous than eating a standard american diet? What would the harm be in trying keto for say 30 or 60 days to see what the results are? We know that, that duration of time surely cannot cause heart disease.”

Mindy says her acid reflux went away the first day on Keto and other health issues like depression and obesity have disappeared as well. She says she has never felt better in her life and wants others to benefit from what helped her. 

Well, I guess that gives a bit of happy relief to those who are planning to have some cheesy bacon ranch chicken, a hearty chili or bacon-wrapped veggies for Thanksgiving. Here are some Keto recipes if you would like to check out. Happy Thanksgiving!

Almost 62% of women with PCOS using PCOS Tracker said they did not follow any particular diet pattern, ate what they liked, but healthy. What’s considered healthy for women dealing with PCOS? I will be coming up with that next week, as well as what some of our eminent PCOS experts have to say about diet when dealing with PCOS, and for our general “womanly” health.

Until then happy tracking and Happy Thanksgiving!

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week Nov 21, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
6970796

When I was a teenager, I was not aware that having irregular periods may be a sign of something grave. I was never diagnosed with PCOS. But the more I read about it, the more my symptoms made me think I may have had PCOS. Few years down the line since then, I had to deal with two miscarriages and more than 7 years of trying ARTs, failures and trying again to reach parenthood. Many girls/women suffering from PCOS remain undiagnosed or are misdiagnosed because they are confused about their symptoms, think it’s normal, and never see a specialist. So, we thought it is imperative that they be educated about their symptoms and equipped to keep track of their PCOS symptoms day by day and month by month – hence the PCOS Tracker. Moreover knowledge shared by us “citizen scientists” via PCOS tracker may lead the physicians and scientists to new insights into this little understood disorder affecting 1 in 5 women.

I also wanted to share with you all this Petition started by my PCOS buddy Ashley Levinson @PCOSgurl who has been advocating for PCOS since the last 20 years. Ashley started this Petition to NIH Director Francis Collins and others “to allocate more than 0.1% of funding to the approximately 30 million women affected in The United States.” She urges that NIH “needs to engage and direct federal agencies to support more research, better physician education and better tools and resources for women and girls with the syndrome to live healthier lives with healthier outcomes!” Please sign the petition and help make PCOS, which is affecting millions worldwide, a health priority.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week Nov 14, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
6589682

How are AGEs related to PCOS?


We are analysing the data we got on diet and PCOS. We asked the women tracking their PCOS symptoms with PCOS Tracker what they thought of their body weight? We also asked them if they followed a particular kind of diet. We will also share with you what our eminent PCOS experts have to say about diet when dealing with PCOS. That’s coming up soon!

Meanwhile, I was reading about AGE and PCOS. No not AGE as age in years! When we domesticated fire, it taught us how to make food easily digestible, but we also learnt how to create AGEs – Advanced Glycosylation End products – highly reactive molecules formed when SUGAR or Carbohydrates reacts with other molecules like proteins, nucleic acids and lipids in our bodies. We can also contribute to high levels of AGEs in our bodies by eating foods loaded with AGEs. After-all who does not like bacon, fried eggs, cheese loaded fries and hash browns?

Why am I talking about AGEs? 

Because dietary AGEs have been shown to cause metabolic and reproductive alterations in PCOS. They have been associated with increased inflammation, insulin resistance, obesity and ovulatory dysfunction in PCOS. Here’s how this article published in Journal Nutrients explains:

Picture Courtesy: Garg & Merhi, 2015; Link between AGEs and Ovulatory Dysfunction in PCOS

How can we reduce AGEs intake?

A few things to know about AGEs formation before we get to that. 

  • Food and Smoking are the most common sources of external AGEs that one can come across daily.
  • How food is prepared contributes to a lot of AGEs produced. Cooking methods, time and temperature including food composition – all matters.

Where are AGEs most commonly found?

  • Western type diet
  • Animal derived products
  • Fast foods
  • High fat foods

Till the time scientists are working to know the optimal low-AGE diet to prevent/treat the hormonal imbalance and the ovulatory dysfunction observed in women with PCOS, we can try to reduce AGEs in our diet by:

  • Preparing food at low temperature with high moisture and brief heating time
  • Using acidic marinades such as lemon juice and vinegar
  • Supplementing with Vitamin D

Low-fat plant-derived foods, like boiled or baked beans, typically are low in AGEs, studies show. You can check out a more detailed list of foods with their AGE content here.

It is believed that reduced intake of diet containing AGEs is associated with less oxidative stress and improved insulin sensitivity and that modifying food preparation methods to reduce formation of AGEs could potentially improve ovulatory dysfunction associated with PCOS.


More updates from PCOS Tracker data coming soon!

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week Nov 7, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
6155769

Does exercise help keep the pounds off?

What did we ask?

We asked the women tracking their PCOS symptoms with PCOS Tracker what they thought of their body weight? We also asked them if they engaged in some kind of physical activity everyday?

What did we find?

Only 2% of the women  who said they were diagnosed with PCOS said they were underweight and 20% said they had a normal weight. About 45% of women who said they were diagnosed with PCOS said they were overweight and 32% said they were Obese. 

Body weight and PCOS Diagnosis

We analysed the data to know how many women belonging to different body weight categories did engage in some physical activity daily. We got interesting insights. Here is what we saw:

Of the women who said they had normal body weight, 54% said they did some physical activity everyday.

Daily Physical Activity in Women with Normal Body Weight

Of the women who said they were underweight, 50% said they did some physical activity everyday.

Daily Physical Activity in Underweight Women

Of the women who said they were overweight, 51% said they did some physical activity everyday.

Daily Physical Activity in Overweight Women

Of the women who said they were obese, 56% said they did some physical activity everyday.

Daily Physical Activity in Obese Women

Digging Deeper 

The weight loss world has always been controversial and we are still wading through murky waters. Clearly the results from PCOS Tracker data do not show that exercise helps in reducing weight for everyone. Gary Taubes, an investigator journalist and a keto diet proponent questions the common notion that exercise helps reduce weight. He believes exercise for weight loss does not work, because it also increases your appetite and makes you eat more too. But he also says

“This is not to say that there aren’t excellent reasons to be physically active. We might just enjoy exercise. We may increase our overall fitness; we may live longer, perhaps by reducing our risk of heart disease or diabetes; we’ll probably feel better about ourselves. But there’s no reason to think we will lose any significant amount of weight, and little reason to think we will prevent ourselves from gaining it.”

As he quotes a quote George Cahill Jr, a retired Harvard professor of medicine and expert on insulin, phrased for him

“Carbohydrates is driving insulin is driving fat.”

Here is what some eminent PCOS researchers and clinicians have to say about exercise, insulin resistance and weight loss, in relation to PCOS.

Exercise and increasing your heart rate past 135 for at least 20 minutes every other day to really amp up your cardio so that the heart, which is a muscle pump and improves your circulation, which then can improve your overall health as well as the weight issue is if there is one.

Dr Carolyn Alexander, PCOS Expert, Southern California Reproductive Center.

We had a great hour of discussion with Dr Alexander last week along with Ashley Levinson @PCOSGurl & Michelle Shwarz @twinmamachelle Dr Alexander simplified many PCOS related queries for us. To listen to the full talk click: http://bit.ly/32szQed

Dr Jen Gunter, often called Twitter’s resident gynecologist, believes

“One therapy that can almost always be recommended to PCOS patients is exercise, which helps the body use insulin more effectively and can reduce the risk of diabetes.”

Dr Anastassia Amaro, a specialist in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of endocrinological conditions including diabetes, weight and lipid disorders at Center for Weight and Eating Disorders at the University of Pennsylvania says

“Insulin resistance is associated with excessive weight. In fact, people who gained weight may develop insulin resistance. On the other hand, people who are born with a predisposition to insulin resistance, are more likely to gain weight. So that is why women with PCOS often times have excess weight.”

Most weight loss experts believe that exercise works for weight maintenance but not weight loss. In their joint guidelines for physical activity and health, the American Heart Association and the American College of Sports Medicine suggest that

30 minutes of moderate physical activity five days a week is necessary to ‘promote and maintain health’

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 31, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
5814775

How is the intensity of menstrual flow affected by body weight in women with symptoms of PCOS?

So this week we tried to explore if there is an association between body weight and intensity of menstrual flow when it comes to PCOS. I read that PCOS causes heavy menstrual flow (Menorrhagia) particularly in Obese women and so explored further the data we are getting on PCOS Tracker. 

What we asked?

We asked the women tracking their PCOS symptoms with PCOS Tracker, about how they saw their body weight for their height. We also asked what the Intensity of their menstrual flow has been in the last six months. 

And here is what we found.

Women with normal body weight showed the following pattern of menstrual flow intensity.

Normal Body weight and Intensity of Menstrual Flow

Women who said they had body weight in the overweight category showed the following pattern of menstrual flow intensity.

Overweight body weight and Intensity of Menstrual Flow

Women who said they had body weight in the obese category showed the following pattern of menstrual flow intensity.

Obese body weight and Intensity of Menstrual Flow

Pooling the percentage of “heavy” and “very heavy” menstrual flow intensities we observe that 38% women with normal weight said they had heavy menstrual flow, followed by 44% Overweight women having heavy menstrual flow, followed by a little more than 50% women in the Obese category who said they had heavy menstrual flow.

Digging Deeper 

Now the question is why? Digging deeper I found the reason, and that is

More fat cells equals comparatively more estrogen equals heavy bleeding. 

Estrogen hormone is normally produced by our ovaries and responsible for thickening the uterine lining before we bleed them out at the end of a cycle, if pregnancy did not establish. But our fat cells also like to produce it leading to heavy periods in overweight and obese women. Not only that, too much estrogen from fat cells can start troubling the other menstrual hormones disturbing the cycles and making them infrequent. Studies have shown that for the same reason, although we have similar treatment modalities of menstrual disorder for normal weight and obese women, their effectiveness may vary in women with higher BMI .

This seems like an interesting insight from preliminary analysis of PCOS Tracker data. Studying in detail why those 32% of obese women have normal periods may lead us to insights on how obese and overweight women can be helped better. This could be a topic to be researched in more detail and analyse the data in a more organised way.

Have thoughts on this data? Would love to know. Would also love to know how PCOS Tracker is helping you. Leave your comments below.

If you have questions like these on your mind that you would like to analyse write to me at shweta@trialx.com. We are also open to collaborate for data analysis with research teams that might be interested.

We are talking to Dr Carolyn Alexander of SCRC on November 7, 2019 at 3pm PST (6pm EST) about new developments in PCOS management. RSVP to listen and post your questions here: http://bit.ly/32szQed
Dr Alexander and I will be joined by Ashley Levinson @PCOSGurl and Michelle Schwarz @twinmamachelle on the patient panel to guide the discussion from patient’s perspective.


PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 24, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
5425731

What did women diagnosed with PCOS say about the Intensity of their menstrual flow?

What did we ask?

We asked the PCOS Tracker participants about what the Intensity of their menstrual flow have been in the last six months, with response options ranging from “very heavy” to “very light” with 5 being normal on a 1-10 scale.

What did we find? 

Of the folks tracking their PCOS symptoms using PCOS Tracker, 87% said that they were diagnosed with PCOS. 

PCOS Diagnosis and Intensity of Menstrual Flow

Of these 87% of women diagnosed with PCOS, almost 43% of women said they had heavy menstrual flow (30% women chose “Heavy” and 13.4% chose “Very Heavy”). About 40% women said they had normal menstrual flow followed by 18% having light and very light menstrual flow.

Does PCOS cause “heavy” or “light” menstrual flow? From what we know as a common symptom of PCOS, are irregular periods which is defined as fewer than eight menstrual periods in a year. But does fewer means lighter as well? It does not seem so. From what we see from PCOS Tracker data more than 40% of women diagnosed with PCOS had heavy or very heavy menstrual flow compared to only 18% having light and very light menstrual flow.

Digging deeper I found some studies show that PCOS causes heavy flow in Obese women. Next week I will be analysing what PCOS Tracker data shows when looking at the association of obesity and heavy menstrual flow. Stay tuned!

If you have queries on PCOS, you can send us your questions to shweta@trialx.com and we will discuss it with Dr Carolyn Alexander of SCRC on November 7, 2019 at 3pm PST (6pm EST) on curetalks.com. To listen to Dr Alexander RSVP here: http://bit.ly/32szQed You can also post your questions on this page. 

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

What would you like to track via PCOS Tracker? What insight would you be interested in finding? Write to me at shweta@trialx.com!

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 17, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two
Weeks
5054670

What did women diagnosed with PCOS say about the Length of their menstrual cycles?

What did we ask?

We asked the PCOS Tracker participants about what the length of their menstrual cycles have been in the last six months, with response options ranging from number of days to ‘highly irregular’.

What did we find? 

Eighty seven percent of the folks tracking their PCOS symptoms using PCOS Tracker said that they were diagnosed with PCOS. Of these 87% of women diagnosed with PCOS, almost 60% of the women said they had “highly irregular” menstrual cycles. Moreover, about 10% of women had their cycles longer than 35 days. “Irregular menstrual cycles” was also the most prominent reason that made women who were NOT diagnosed with PCOS, THINK they may have PCOS.


PCOS Diagnosis and Length of Menstrual Cycle 

Long and irregular menstrual cycles have been have been the hallmark of PCOS and associated with increased risk of specific subtypes of ovarian cancer.

Irregular periods have been defined as less than eight periods in a year or menstrual cycles longer than 35 days. According to CDC, irregular periods maybe caused by lack of ovulation. But researchers are still trying to understand that if women with PCOS have multiple follicles in their ovaries, why can’t they ovulate? Interestingly enough, studies have shown that women with PCOS gain regular menstrual cycles with aging, “solely caused by follicle loss through the process of ovarian ageing.” 


Are women with PCOS who have “highly irregular periods” more prone to having infertility issues compared to women with PCOS who have regular periods but show other PCOS symptoms as predominant ones? We are going to learn about this and other developments in PCOS management while talking to PCOS expert Dr Carolyn Alexander of Southern California Reproductive Center on November 7, 2019 at 3pm PST (6pm EST) on curetalks.com. If you would like to ask a question to Dr Alexander, please send them to me at shweta@trialx.com OR just post it in comments section on the talk page.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week October 10, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two Weeks
4676669

How did women diagnosed with PCOS perceive their body weight for their height?

What did we ask?

Of the folks tracking their PCOS symptoms using PCOS Tracker, 87% said that they were diagnosed with PCOS. We asked the participants about how their body weight for their height looked like to them?

What did we find?

Of the 87.2% of women who said they were diagnosed with PCOS, 45% of women said they were Overweight, followed by 32% who said they were Obese. Only 2% of those women said they were underweight, the rest being normal in weight. 

PCOS Diagnosis & Body Weight

Does PCOS cause weight gain issues OR Does being overweight/obese lead to PCOS? Well, this seems to be a chicken and egg problem. The relationship of body weight and PCOS is complex and researchers are still looking for an answer. PCOS Tracker data shows that even though being overweight is associated with PCOS, women with normal body weight or underweight women can also have PCOS.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week

October 3, 2019

Number of Participants
Tracking PCOS Symptoms
Participants Added in Last Two Weeks
4375736

What was the most common symptom that made women think they had PCOS?

What did we ask?

We asked the PCOS Tracker participants if they were diagnosed with PCOS or if they just thought that they may have PCOS. About 11% of the participants said they thought they may have PCOS. 

Further, we asked them what symptoms made them think they may have PCOS. 

What did we find?

Of the 11% participants who thought they may have PCOS, majority of them (nearly 40%) chose “very irregular periods” as the symptom that made them think so.” 

Next, nearly 30% of women said “extra hair problem” was one of the symptoms, that made them think they may have PCOS, followed by “severe acne problem” (20%) and “male pattern baldness” (7%).

According to the CDC, to determine if you have PCOS, irregular periods is one of the three main symptoms your doctor will look for. The other two symptoms of PCOS are: higher testosterone (male hormone) levels and multiple cysts on the ovaries.

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

When I was a teenager, I was not aware that having irregular periods may be a sign of something grave. I was never diagnosed with PCOS. But the more I read about it, the more my symptoms made me think I may have had PCOS. Many girls/women remain undiagnosed because they are confused about their symptoms, think it’s normal, and never see a specialist. So, we thought it is imperative that they be educated about their symptoms and equipped to keep track of their PCOS symptoms day by day and month by month. Moreover knowledge shared by these “citizen scientists” may lead the physicians and scientists to new insights into this disease. 

TrialX PCOS Tracker app made on DIY app making platform Appbakery is being used by thousands of women who have been diagnosed with PCOS or whose symptoms make them think they may have PCOS. Almost 7K women are tracking their daily and monthly symptoms related to PCOS by means of surveys.

PCOS tracker can be downloaded on iOS as well as android phones.

These women are also tracking their daily physical activity, sleep and diet patterns, so that they can understand how these parameters affect their PCOS symptoms and vice versa. In addition, the tracker also allows them to track their sleep duration and steps using their phone’s sensors and wearable (Fitbit).

Moreover, women using PCOS Tracker are also monitoring their neuropsychological functioning and motor fitness by performing ‘active tasks’ integrated into the app. For example, by performing the Finger Tapping Speed active task users are measuring their basic motor capabilities such as speed, accuracy, and rhythm.

Participants can gain access to their data by contacting us at shweta@trialx.com, in case they would like to discuss it with their physicians, so as to better inform their physician’s risk assessment and screening recommendations.

The app is HIPPA compliant and users remain anonymous while using the application. All data is handled with utmost security in compliance with data protection policies.

The analysis of data shared by participants using the PCOS Tracker shows several interesting insights. We will be sharing one new insight with you every week.


PCOS Tracker Insight of the Week

September 26, 2019

Number of Participants Tracking PCOS SymptomsParticipants Added in Last Two Weeks
4027722

Does having a family history of diabetes make women more prone to PCOS? 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a strong independent risk factor and a leading cause of diabetes in women. But does having a family history of diabetes make you more prone to developing PCOS? According to CDC, PCOS tends to run in families. Women whose mother or sister has PCOS or type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop PCOS.

What did we ask?

Analysing data shared on PCOS diagnosis and family history, we got an interesting insight. We asked the participants if they were diagnosed with PCOS or if they just thought that they may have PCOS. We also asked them if they had a family history of PCOS, Diabetes, CVD, Gestational diabetes, or None.

PCOS Tracker Data Analysis – Diagnosis of PCOS

What did we find?

Eighty seven percent of women using the app said they were diagnosed with PCOS and 10.9% said they thought they have PCOS.

PCOS Tracker Data Analysis – Family History

Of these 87% of women diagnosed with PCOS, maximum number of women said they had a family history of diabetes (40.8%), followed by women who did not have a family history of any of these conditions (29.5%), followed by 21.5% women who said they had a family history of PCOS. These observations from the PCOS tracker app corroborates the earlier findings, that having diabetes or metabolic disturbances similar to diabetes maybe a risk factor in the development of PCOS.

About few weeks back, The National Institutes of Health, Apple, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health announced their research partnership for a major long-term study of women’s health. Apple’s new Research App will be in App store later this year for iOS users to download. As Ars Technica cites, “researchers will leverage participants voluntary use of a smartphone research app” to collect data on menstrual cycles and gynaecological health.”

TrialX PCOS Tracker is equipping larger group of women to track their PCOS symptoms via both Apple and Android smartphones for free, so they can inform themselves and their physicians better.

What would you like to track via PCOS Tracker? What insight would you be interested in finding? Write to me at shweta@trialx.com!

Don’t forget to come back here to check for new insights from PCOS Tracker every week.

Any questions and queries regarding the PCOS Tracker app can be communicated to shweta@trialx.com.


1Comment
  • brunch n lunch
    Posted at 15:10h, 14 November Reply

    Very good article. I am dealing with many of these issues as well..

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