By: ifood.tv

Calculating Blood Volume by Dilution of Hemoglobin – Pilot Study

Jul 16, 2013 No Comments by

Although blood volume is such an important parameter in everyday clinical medicine it cannot
be measured easily. As a matter of fact, it is almost never measured but estimated or
calculated based upon numbers derived from mostly healthy patients.

The investigators do not even know whether someone's normal – i.e. before a surgery – blood
volume is actually anywhere close to the generally accepted estimate or calculation.

Tests exist in which a substance of known concentration is diluted in a person's blood
volume and the resulting concentration is then measured, which allows the blood volume to be
calculated. However, none of these tests can be completed at the bedside since they are not
fast and require considerable set-up.

This study turns the above approach upside-down: we will dilute the blood slightly with a
known small volume of an intravenous fluid commonly used in many clinical settings and
measure the concentra-tion of hemoglobin – the oxygen carrier contained in red blood cells -
before and after adding the fluid. That allows for similar calculations without using
neither specialized substances nor equipment.

Hemoglobin is routinely measured in laboratories and is often a routine test before and
during surg-eries and in intensive care units.

Devices that can measure hemoglobin through the skin without actually drawing any blood are
avail-able. If found comparable to laboratory determination of hemoglobin they could provide
for a bedside and almost real-time assessment of blood volume, something that could be
extremely valuable for de-cision making in critical areas of medicine and promoting goal
directed therapies.

Clinical Trial Conditions: Determine Validity of Concept of Using Hemoglobin Dilution to Assess/Measure Blood Volume.

Treatments in this Clinical Trial : Blood Volume Dilution

Eligible Clinical Trial Participant Age : Between 18 years to 50 years

Can Healthy Volunteers Participate: Yes

Clinical Trial Lead Sponsor: Kai Schoenhage

Detailed Clinical Trial Description: Although blood volume is such an important parameter in everyday clinical medicine it cannot
be measured easily. As a matter of fact, it is almost never measured but estimated or
calculated based upon numbers derived from mostly healthy patients.

The investigators do not even know whether someone's normal – i.e. before a surgery – blood
volume is actually anywhere close to the generally accepted estimate or calculation.

Tests exist in which a substance of known concentration is diluted in a person's blood
volume and the resulting concentration is then measured, which allows the blood volume to be
calculated. However, none of these tests can be completed at the bedside since they are not
fast and require considerable set-up.

This study turns the above approach upside-down: we will dilute the blood slightly with a
known small volume of an intravenous fluid commonly used in many clinical settings and
measure the concentra-tion of hemoglobin – the oxygen carrier contained in red blood cells -
before and after adding the fluid. That allows for similar calculations without using
neither specialized substances nor equipment.

Hemoglobin is routinely measured in laboratories and is often a routine test before and
during surg-eries and in intensive care units.

Devices that can measure hemoglobin through the skin without actually drawing any blood are
avail-able. If found comparable to laboratory determination of hemoglobin they could provide
for a bedside and almost real-time assessment of blood volume, something that could be
extremely valuable for de-cision making in critical areas of medicine and promoting goal
directed therapies.

The clinical trial information was obtained from http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01900769

New Clinical Trial

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By: ifood.tv